Hampton Morris – November 2017 Featured Athlete

Hampton Morris

Meet Hampton Morris — our featured athlete for the month of November.  Hampton is a 13 year old youth weightlifter from Marietta, Georgia and is currently competing in the 50kg weight class.

When did you get started in this sport?

My first meet was on July 9th, 2016.

What (or who) got you started?

My dad.

What do you enjoy most about weightlifting?

Making new lifting friends.

What does your current training routine look like (hours per day, days per week, where you train, who you train with)?

I usually lift 3-4 days per week, 2-3 days in competition weeks, and I try to mobilize as often as possible.  I usually train in my basement or at Crossfit Dwala.  My dad is my coach.

What one or two things do you currently do in your training that has been impactful?:

I think one of the most impactful parts of my training is how often I mobilize.

What do you carry around with you in your gym bag that has nothing to do with weightlifting?

I usually have only lifting-related items in my gym bag, but if I know that I will have a lot of time that I won’t be lifting, I may bring a book or some homework.

What is your diet like?

I just eat normal food.

Who do you look up to in the sport?  Why?

I look up to CJ Cummings and Harrison Maurus because of how successful they have been and how early their success began, and it inspires me to believe that I can do just as well as them.

What friendships has this sport brought your way?

Some friends that I have that I probably wouldn’t have if I weren’t a weightlifter are Logan Davies and Destiny Karch.

Are you coachable?

Yes

What qualities do great coaches possess?

Understanding how their athlete works, and how to help them work around setbacks.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?  Did you take it?

Ignore the things outside of your control, and focus on the things that are in your control.

What characteristics do you strive for (on and off the platform)?

I always try to stay calm, patient, and I always try to have fun.

If you gave everything that you owned away except three things, what would you keep?

I would keep my Kindle with all of my favorite books, including A Prayer for Owen Meany, my vintage Adidas lifters, and my Coffee’s Gym T-shirt.

When you have random free time, how do you spend it?

If I don’t feel like watching whatever’s on TV, I will probably read a book while listening to music, or play with my sister.

If you could master anything (besides weightlifting), what would it be?

I would master soccer.

What have you learned from weightlifting that helps you in other parts of your life?

I have learned how to stay calm during difficult situations, and that it’s always important to be patient.

The last time you were knocked down (or discouraged) in this sport, how did you get back up?

I just stopped thinking about it and focused on what I could do to get past it.

What is the question no one has ever asked you that you’ve always wanted to answer?

I don’t know of any.

What are you most grateful for?

My awesome family and my adorable dog, Dexter.

Where does your strength come from?

I challenge myself and get challenged by others to do my best, every day.

USA Weightlifting’s New Athlete Development Sites

On October 16, 2017, USA Weightlifting (USAW) announced 13 Athlete Development Sites located in the West and Southeast United States.  The announcement of these sites raised a number of questions:

  • What will the sites be used for?
  • Who can attend events at the sites?
  • What kinds of events will be hosted at the sites?
  • How much will the events cost?

I spoke to Suzy Sanchez, USAW Director of Development Programs, and gathered information about this new opportunity.

Q: Why did USAW create the Athlete Development Sites?

In April 2017, USAW created Athlete Development Camps.  We executed a three-month trial run in the West and Southeast.  After running the camps, however, we realized that we needed to restructure.  The purpose of the camps was to attract new athletes, not to educate existing athletes.  In fact, however, many of the athletes who signed up for the camps were seasoned athletes.  There was some dissatisfaction from these athletes who felt that they did not learn much from the camps.

From this experience, we gathered that our members are seeking opportunities for continuing education.  We created the Athlete Development Sites to replace the development camps and to offer continuing education opportunities for our members.

Q: Why did you select these particular sites?

The two largest pockets of weightlifting in the United States are in the West and Southeast.  We wanted to create sites in areas where we could serve the most members.  We also selected gyms that are run by coaches who are certified at the national level or higher.  We are constantly working to foster good relationships between gym owners and USA Weightlifing and feel that this program will facilitate that.  We also hope that the sites will link up talented athletes and talented coaches, creating more opportunities within the sport.

Q: What will the Athlete Development Sites offer?

The Athlete Development Sites will host five different types of clinics: Snatch, Clean & Jerk, Advanced Movement, Youth Weightlifting, and Introduction to Weightlifting.

Two of the clinics—Youth Weightlifting and Introduction to Weightlifting—will offer introductory instruction to beginners.

Three of the clinics—Snatch, Clean & Jerk, and Advanced Movement—will offer continuing education to seasoned athletes and coaches.

Q: What is the cost of attending a clinic?

We will be charging $99 for each clinic.  We hope the fee for the clinic, along with multiple site locations, will keep costs manageable for athletes and coaches.

Q: How can people register for a course?

Registration will take place through WebPoint on the USAW website.

USAW will issue an official press release with more details in November.  For further questions, contact Suzy Sanchez at Suzy.Sanchez@usaweightlifting.org.  

Photos courtesy of Lifting.Life and USAW website.

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Antwan Kilbert – October 2017 Featured Athlete

It is with great pleasure that we introduce you to our featured athlete for the month of October: Antwan Kilbert.  Antwan is an amazing athlete and inspiration to young weightlifters in the US and abroad.  His character, as well as his strength, is admirable (and something worth paying attention to!).

When did you get started in this sport?

I started when was only 11 years old.

What (or who) got you started?

I saw my brother doing it and I tried it.What do you enjoy most about weightlifting? I like lifting the big weights.  Also, I like when you have to yell to get out of a squat, and everyone else screams with you.

What does your current training routine look like ?

I train from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. four days a week, and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

What one or two things do you currently do in your training that has been impactful?

I stretch a lot, and I make sure I drink a lot of water when working out.  Plus, I’ve recently been working on having a better state of mind when I’m training.

What is your diet like?

When I don’t have a meet coming up, I like eating Pizza rolls, honey buns and pop tarts.  But when a meet is coming up, I try to stick to meats and vegetables and fruit.  I cut out almost everything to drink but water.

Who do you look up to in the sport?

My coach, Jimmy Duke, and the Barnes brothers.

Why?

My Coach has always been there for me, and Darren and Darrel Barnes have great examples and have inspired me

What friendships has this sport brought your way?

I met my best friend and training partner, Jerome Smith, and Emma Nye (a friend from Kansas City).  There are a lot of people I like to catch up with at meets–athletes I have traveled with to the OTC and International meets.

Are you coachable?

Yes, for the most part I am.  I get a little mad sometimes.

What qualities do great coaches possess?

Patience, good advice, and having years of experience in the sport.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

Over the last year, I have really been struggling with my jerks.  One Thursday before a Saturday meet, my coach had me work with another coach in the room.  He told me to keep my feet in “two lines”.  My coach had been telling me I was lining up my feet . . . same thing, just different words, but I had a 7kg Clean & Jerk PR because of it.  Also, I have recently been trying to take more time setting up, and that has really been helping.

What characteristics do you strive for (on and off the platform)?

Discipline, respect, and consistency.

If you gave everything that you owned away except three things, what would you keep?

My shoes, my house and my bed.

When you have random free time, how do you spend it?

I play basketball.

If you could master anything (besides weightlifting), what would it be?

Kick boxing.

What have you learned from weightlifting that helps you in other parts of your life?

Discipline.

The last time you were knocked down (or discouraged) in this sport, how did you get back up?

The last time I was really discouraged, I was at a meet.  I really messed up on my snatches.  I was upset and didn’t even want to clean and jerk at all.  My coach talked me out of it and got me thinking positive again.  I came back and did well in the clean jerk, and even made a 7kg Clean and Jerk PR!

What is the question no one has ever asked you that you’ve always wanted to answer?

How do you do it every day?  Could another person go a day in your shoes?

What are you most grateful for?

My mom and Jerome and Jimmy for being by my side the whole time.

Where does your strength come from?

Squats, a lot of squats!

What is your goal in weightlifting?

To make to the Olympics one day, but I want to go to the Youth Olympics First!

Elle Hatamiya – September 2017 Featured Athlete

Please let us introduce you to our featured athlete for the month of September: Elle Hatamiya.  Besides being an Instagram sensation, Elle is an amazing athlete (in weightlifting as well as dojo and gymnastics).  Elle is currently 12 years old and competes in the 35kg class.

Where is home?

 Albany, California

When did you get started in this sport
I started lifting when I was 10. 
What (or who) got you started?
My mom does CrossFit so then I started doing CrossFit, but I liked the Olympic-style lifts more so I started just training and competing in weightlifting.
What do you enjoy most about weightlifting?

I like the feeling of doing the lifts.

What does your current training routine look like (hours per day, days per week, where you train, who you train with)?
I train at my barbell club, Endgame Athletics, twice per week for an hour each time. I have private sessions with my brother, Jude, who trains CrossFit with our coach, Arnold Chua.  I also train with my gymnastics team, Golden Bear Gymnastics Academy, 22 hours per week over 4 days.  And, I  train at my martial arts dojo twice per week for an hour each time. Our style is called Cuong Nhu.
Even though I train 26 hours per week, I still go to regular public school, so everything happens after school and on Saturday.  I have Sundays off, unless I have a competition, because all of my training locations are closed on Sundays.
What one or two things do you currently do in your training that has been impactful?
I do a lot of power snatches and power cleans to get stronger and faster. 
What do you carry around with you in your gym bag that has nothing to do with weightlifting?
Nothing
What is your diet like?
I mostly eat food that my mom cooks:  organic as much as possible, grassfed meat, lots of fruit.  I prefer not to eat processed foods.  For breakfast, I typically have an egg, fruit, and milk. I bring lunch to school; mostly leftovers.  After school, on my way to training, I have a good snack that usually includes protein, fruit, and maybe rice.  After training, I eat a home cooked dinner.  If it’s not home cooked, it could be a burrito or sushi–something that’s relatively easy to start eating in the car.
Who do you look up to in the sport?  Why
I look up to Sarah Robles because she medaled in the Olympics. I also look up to C.J. Cummings and Harrison Maurus because they are kids but they are really strong. 
What friendships has this sport brought your way?
I get to meet lots of people at camps and competitions. I also get lots of supporters around the world though my Instagram. 
Are you coachable?
Yes
What qualities do great coaches possess
They are supportive, they believe in you, they push you, and they listen to you. 
What is the best advice you’ve ever received? Did you take it?

Do what you love. Yes, I took it.

What characteristics do you strive for (on and off the platform)
Caring, calm, modest, confident. 
If you gave everything that you owned away except three things, what would you keep?
Notebook, pencil, and clothes.
When you have random free time, how do you spend it?
I make slime or origami or I play with my brother, Jude, who is 2 years younger than me. 
If you could master anything (besides weightlifting), what would it be?

 I am also a gymnast, so it would be gymnastics.

What have you learned from weightlifting that helps you in other parts of your life?
I have mental toughness and I can perfect my technique.
The last time you were knocked down (or discouraged) in this sport, how did you get back up?
At Youth Nationals I missed my first lift, but I didn’t let that discourage me or get to me; I just moved on from it and I made the rest of my lifts. 
What is the question no one has ever asked you that you’ve always wanted to answer?

 I don’t know.

What are you most grateful for?

I am grateful I have a family that supports me, I live in a good place, and I get to do what I love. 

Where does your strength come from?

 I just keep working hard and pushing myself.

Mom, I Need New Shoes! Shoe Buying Tips for Youth Weightlifters

Child: “Mom, I need new shoes.”

Mom: “I just bought you new shoes.”

Child: “Well, they don’t fit any more.”

Mom: “I can’t buy you shoes this minute. You’ll just have to make those shoes work.”

It is likely that EVERY child and parent in modern history has had this conversation.

As a parent, it is annoying that kids’ feet grow so quickly. As a child, it is equally annoying that you have to get new shoes just when your old ones start to feel comfortable.  Like it or not, larger feet—and new shoes—are a part of growing up.  Normally, getting new shoes is not a big problem. Plenty of stores sell shoes—you just go into a store that sells the shoes you want, find a pair that fits, and then negotiate with your parents, who always try to talk you into the “cheap” shoes.

When it comes to weightlifting shoes, however, the solution is not so easy!

Weightlifting shoes are not ordinary athletic shoes. They have a raised heel, a hard, flat sole and straps. These features allow a weightlifter get into a deeper squat by permitting a greater range of motion in the ankle. They also provide better stability in the foot when standing up heavy weights.

Selecting weightlifting shoes can be a frustrating process.

    • At $100 to $200 a pair, weightlifting shoes are expensive.
    • Sporting goods stores do not carry weightlifting shoes, so you cannot simply go into a store, try on shoes, and find the pair that suits you.
    • You are going to be spending a LOT of time training in these shoes, so you want to get some that are comfortable and suit your lifting needs.

 

Selecting YOUTH weightlifting shoes offers additional challenges—

    • Youth athletes’ feet are constantly growing, which means you will probably need a new pair of lifting shoes every six months to a year.
    • Most weightlifting shoes are built for adult weightlifters, so finding a size that fits a youth lifter can be a challenge.

 

For starters, consider whether you actually NEED new weightlifting shoes . . .

    • Do you lift competitively? If you lift weights to build strength or as conditioning for another sport—or simply for recreation, you may not need weightlifting shoes. Weightlifting shoes provide stability for the feet; this stability becomes particularly noticeable with heavy weights. However, general strength building does not require maxing out with heavy weights. It can be accomplished with submaximal weights and higher repetitions. At lower weights, the benefits of a weightlifting shoe may not be noticeable.
    • Can you buy some used shoes? Ask around your gym. You might find another lifter who is willing to sell you their perfectly good, barely used shoes. Since you’ll probably grow out of the shoes in another 6 months to a year, save your parents some money and accept the used shoes! If it grosses you out to wear someone else’s sweaty shoes, replace the insole. Shoe insoles can be purchased at any drugstore for $10 or less.

If you really DO need new shoes, consider these pointers:

    • Buy a little larger than you need. You want your weightlifting shoes to fit snugly. However, you don’t want to buy new shoes every three months. You can fix this problem by buying a shoe that is a little larger than you need and then adding an extra insole to make the shoe smaller. When your feet grow, take out the extra insole, and your shoe will still fit. We use this trick regularly to extend the wearability of weightlifting shoes.
    • Read reviews! When it comes to weightlifting shoes, one shoe does not suit everyone. Some shoes are wider/narrower; some shoes have a higher heel; some shoes have multiple straps versus a single strap. Fortunately, there are thousands of customer reviews on weightlifting shoes. Find the shoe you are considering on Amazon, and start reading what real customers have to say about it! Read and research until you are confident the shoe is right for you. Keep in mind, however, that most of these reviews are written by and for adult weightlifters, so the review may not be as helpful for you. In the future, I will write an article reviewing weightlifting shoes available to youth lifters. Stay tuned.
    • Shop around. There are only a handful of weightlifting shoe retailers on the market. Start by looking at the manufacturer’s website. For instance, if you are searching for some Nike Romeleo 3s, look at the pricing on nike.com. From there, search other websites, such as Amazon, Eastbay, and Rogue. You can generally find shoes on sale if you search diligently. However, you should always consult the seller’s return policy before buying. You don’t want to get stuck with shoes that arrive too small with no way to return or exchange them!

Don’t love the shoes you have?

 

If you find that you don’t love the weightlifting shoes you purchase, you can return them and get something else, or . . .

    • Remember that you will grow out of them soon! In the course of your weightlifting career, you will own many shoes. Don’t obsess about the perfect shoe.  If it’s not just right this time, you can always purchase a different pair the next time.  My son, Hutch, spent a year wearing second-hand Adidas Powerlift shoes that he didn’t love. However, they only cost me $20, and I told him that he could pick his next pair of shoes. It was a win-win situation. I got out easy on Hutch’s shoes one year, and he got to pick the ones he liked the next year.
    • Training matters more than shoes. Fancy weightlifting shoes are fun. However, they won’t compensate for time in the gym. You will never hear someone win a major weightlifting championship and give the credit to their shoes.

 

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Kuinini Manumua – August 2017 Featured Athlete

Please let us introduce you to our featured athlete for August: Kuinini Manumua.  We are so excited to feature Kuinini who, btw, secured a bronze medal at the Youth World Weightlifting Championship earlier this year!

Where is home?

This question is very vague in a way but I live in San Francisco,California where my home is at. But if you are indicating where is home in how I feel than to me I feel like home is wherever I feel safe and loved. Very cliche in a way but it is how I feel.

When did you get started in this sport?

I started lifting two and a half years ago. Nearing the end of my Freshmen year in high school.

What (or who) got you started?

My current coach, Kevin Doherty introduced me to weightlifting since he was a teacher at the school I am attending for a program named Avid. He is also the weightlifting, track and field and football coach.

What do you enjoy most about weightlifting?

What I enjoy the most about this sport is that I meet the most kindest and sweetest people through this sport and also finding the joy and pleasure in progressing as an athlete and also as an individual.

What does your current training routine look like (hours per day, days per week, where you train, who you train with)?

Since I am on Summer Break right now, I train two hours a day from 1pm to 3pm on Mondays to Fridays. On Saturdays I lift when I am free from 12pm to 2pm because usually I like to go to the movies,  bowling or swimming with friends. I lift for Hassle Free BBC and it is located at the high school I attend, Abraham Lincoln High School. It is a  great environment for me for I get to lift with my friends and also the youth lifters there that are very passionate and dedicated to lifting. They always bring an uplifting feeling to me when I train with these people for they make me want to be successful.

What one or two things do you currently do in your training that has been impactful?

Currently I think the most impactful thing that I do in my training is trying to notice the little mistakes that I do when lifting and fixing it because it really does make a huge impact.

What do you carry around with you in your gym bag that has nothing to do with weightlifting?

Earphones, my phone, wallet and junk food for example like candy especially the blue airheads or hot chips.

What is your diet like?

Honestly speaking, I eat anything that I want. In the mornings, I eat French Toast with bacon and scrambled eggs most of time. On my way to training, I would eat  a banana or strawberries. After training, my friend Savannah and I would pick a place to get food from. Everyday is a different place where we eat all types of food of our choice. From sandwhiches of our choice to Chinese food to anything really that is very delicious. For dinner, I eat whatever my parents cooks up for dinner.

Who do you look up to in the sport?  Why?

Since I am kind of new to knowing the big time lifters in this sport, I don’t look up to anyone yet but I do however have to say that Olga Zubova’s jerks are to die for.

What friendships has this sport brought your way?

This sport introduced me to the people and friends that I know now which I am really close to. It is never a daunting day with the friends I have in weightlifting for they are very supportive, very funny and very energetic.

Are you coachable?

This a very funny question to ask but gladly I am very coachable. That would be a nightmare for my coach if I wasn’t.

What qualities do great coaches possess?

Great coaches are leaders that guides and empowers their athletes, so of course they should have the quality of leadership and also knowledge for they must know the sport they are teaching. Other qualities great coaches possess are effective communication skills, consistency and knowing the athlete for they have to be aware of their individual difference from other athletes because some coaching tactics work on some while on others it doesn’t.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?  Did you take it?

“The only person that should have more faith and belief in the things you do is not your coach or your parents but yourself.” These were the words spoken to me by Kevin Doherty and it has really stuck with me and I did take that advice. No one else should have more faith in me then myself for if I lack faith in myself then why am I lifting? Others shouldn’t have  to believe and hope of things that I know I can do  and end up empty handed because I lacked confidence. It should be myself that wants it more than anyone.

What characteristics do you strive for (on and off the platform)?

Being humble, optimistic and confident.

If you gave everything that you owned away except three things, what would you keep?

My wallet, phone and my mom’s necklace

When you have random free time, how do you spend it?

I watch Netflix, read a book, swim or sleep.

If you could master anything (besides weightlifting), what would it be?

I would want to master all the languages that has ever existed and will exist in the universe.

What have you learned from weightlifting that helps you in other parts of your life?

I learned that it takes a lot of patience and time lifting and it has really helped me out be more patient towards my siblings and be a better sister.

The last time you were knocked down (or discouraged) in this sport, how did you get back up?

Eating a lot of ice cream and keeping my head held high no matter what happened really helped me during my discouraged times.

What are you most grateful for?

I am most grateful for my mom and dad because I love them so much for they are everything in my life.

Where does your strength come from?

I think my strength comes from the people that are very supportive and encouraging towards me because it makes me work hard and be strong in the things that I do so I won’t disappoint.

What are your weightlifting goals?

Being the best weightlifter I can be.

Enjoying the ride.

Photos by Gene Crain, Lifting Life.

German Youth Weightlifting Competitions: Rules and Scoring

This article contains the specifications for Germany’s youth weightlifting competitions, as seen in “Youth Weightlifting in Germany.” For the original source of the rules and technical charts in German, see here and here.

Youth weightlifting competitions in Germany have two parts: (1) weightlifting and (2) athletics.

WEIGHTLIFTING
Youth weightlifting competitions in Germany emphasize the correct execution of the lifts by including a technique evaluation score for youth up to age 14.   

A maximum of 10 points can be achieved for technique.

This chart breaks down the technical score: Technical Scoring for Weightlifting in Germany

Points are calculated using the following formula:

Snatch—
[(Amount of weight lifted in kg x 50) ÷ Bodyweight] + (Technique Score x 10)

Clean & Jerk—
[(Amount of weight lifted in kg x 50) ÷ Bodyweight] + (Technique Score x 10)

Weightlifting Score = Best Snatch  + Best Clean & Jerk 

Best Snatch/Clean & Jerk = Attempt with the Highest Point Value

ATHLETICS
German youth weightlifting competitions also include an athletic portion to promote the general athleticism of children. The athletic portion includes three events: Ball Throw, Triple Jump, and Star Sprints. Sometimes other events are substituted for these events (e.g. a 30-m sprint may replace the Star Sprints). However, these are the usual exercises tested at the competitions.  Athletics are tested up to age 16.

Athletics Score = Ball Throw Score + Triple Jump Score + Sprint Score

Ball Throw Rules:

  1. Each athlete gets 3 attempts.
  2. The athlete begins with his back facing the throwing field.
  3. The athlete must throw the ball over his head backward with both hands.
  4. A starting line is established at the edge of the throwing field.
  5. Athletes may jump from any point behind the starting line.
  6. Athletes may not jump backward over the starting line. If an athlete lands over the starting line, the attempt is invalidated.
  7. A measuring tape is attached to the side of the throwing field.
  8. The first ball impression is measured, i.e. the distance from where the ball first lands.
  9. The throw is measured in centimeters.
  10. Measurement can be taken in two ways:
    * Right Angle Measurement: Follow a straight line from the first ball impression to the measuring tape.
    * Center Point Measurement: Attach the measuring tape to the center of the starting line. Measure from this point to the first ball impression.

Ball Weight:
Boys Age 16: 5 kg
Boys Age 14-15: 4 kg
Boys Under 13: 3 kg
All Girls: 3 kg

Recommendation: Establish a safe zone around the jumping area, and do not allow spectators or other athletes into this area for safety reasons.

Ball Throw Score = Distance of Best Throw (cm) ÷ Bodyweight

Triple Jump Rules:

  1. Each athlete gets three attempts.
  2. The jump begins from a standing position, i.e. no running-starts.
  3. A starting line is established at one end of the jumping area. The jumping area is about 2 meters wide. A measuring tape is attached to the side of the jumping area.
  4. Athletes must jump from behind the starting line. Touching the starting line invalidates the attempt.
  5. Athletes may not touch the floor with their hands or any other body parts—other than the feet—between jumps.
  6. Athletes must execute three consecutive jumps without noticeable stops between the individual jumps.
  7. The feet must be parallel and touch the ground at the same time during the first and second jumps.
  8. Taking steps between the jumps is not allowed.
  9. Falling forward on completion of the final jump is allowed. Supporting with the hands is also allowed on the final jump, provided it does not change the position of the feet.
  10. The impression closest to the starting line (feet, buttocks, hands) is measured. So, if an athlete falls backward onto his hands after the last jump, the measurement spans from the starting line to the hand impression.
  11. Measurement is taken by following a straight line from impression closest to the starting line to a measuring tape on the side of the jumping area (Right Angle Measurement)

Recommendation: Establish a safe zone around the jumping area, and do not allow spectators or other athletes into this area for safety reasons.

Triple Jump Score = Distance of Best Jump (cm) x 0.2

Star Sprints:

  1. A sprint course is set up as follows:
    * One medicine ball (Ball 1) is positioned on the start line.
    * One medicine ball (Ball 3) is positioned in a straight line,10 meters from Ball 1.
    * Two medicine balls (Balls 2 and 4) are positioned 7 meters from the start line, and 2 meters from the direct line between Balls 1 and 3.
  2. An athlete begins either to the left or the right of Ball 1, with his hand on the ball and his feet behind the start line.
  3. At the command of “On Your Mark, Get Set, Go,” the athlete touches the balls in the following order: 1-2-1-3-1-4-1 or 1-4-1-3-1-2-1.
  4. The athlete’s hand must touch each ball.
  5. False starts are not allowed.
  6. The sprint is completed when the athlete touches Ball 1 for the final time.
  7. If Ball 1 is pushed out of position at any time, the athlete must return the ball to its original position before proceeding.
  8. Before each athlete begins, all balls should be aligned to their original positions.
  9. If an athlete trips or falls during the sprint, he may still complete the sprint.
  10. An attempt is invalid if an athlete does not touch all of the balls or does not otherwise complete the sprint.
  11. Up to 3 timekeepers may be used to record the time of the sprint. If multiple timekeepers are used, the middle time is used for scoring.
  12. Use of spikes or adhesive material on the shoes is not allowed.

Ball Sprint Score = 400 – (Sprint Time in Seconds x 20)

SCORING

An athlete receives two scores for the competition:

(1) A score for the weightlifting portion and

(2) A score for the athletic portion.

The athlete’s final score is the sum of the two scores.

Weightlifting Score = Best Snatch + Best Clean & Jerk

Athletics Score = Ball Throw Score + Triple Jump Score + Sprint Score

FINAL SCORE = WEIGHTLIFTING SCORE + ATHLETICS SCORE

 

 

Kyle Martin, Jr. – July 2017 Featured Athlete

Please let us introduce you to our July 2017 featured athlete: Kyle Martin, Jr.  Kyle is ten years old youth weightlifter competing in the 44 kg weight class and is from Oley, PA.

When did you get started in this sport?

At age 8

What (or who) got you started?

I would go to the gym with my dad and climb the rope until I watched Dane Miller’s niece compete online at youth nationals in 2015. The next day I started training Olympic lifting to get ready for the 2016 youth nationals.

What do you enjoy most about weightlifting?

I like the competitions and hanging out with my teammates at Garage Strength.

What does your current training routine look like?

I train 1-2 hours per day when I am not playing baseball or wrestling. I train at Garage Strength under the supervision of my coaches Dane Miller, Jacob Horst, and DJ Shuttleworth.

What one or two things do you currently do in your training that has been impactful?

I always listen to my coaches and do lot of squats to help improve my clean and jerk.

What do you carry around with you in your gym bag that has nothing to do with weightlifting?

Nothing. Dane Miller will not let me bring iPads or toys into the gym.

What is your diet like?

Cereal in the morning, protein and pasta for lunch, and chicken or PB&J for dinner. Dane does not like it when I eat a lot of sugar.

Who do you look up to in the sport?

Jenny Arthur

Why?

I have meet Jenny a couple times during training. She has always been inspiring and helpful when we have meet. I like watching her and other weightlifters compete online.

What friendships has this sport brought your way?

At meets I see a lot of familiar faces and we get to support each other. I also train with Connor Pennington, 12u lifter, we help push each other to new PRs.

Are you coachable?

Yes. I learned how to take direction from my coaches at a young age when I was in Karate.

What are your long term weightlifting goals?

I want to make a world team and represent the United States! I also want to continue to train  to improve my performance in other sports like baseball and wrestling.

What qualities do great coaches possess?

Patience. My coaches are patient and teach me how to lift with good technique even when I am not having my best day on the platform.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

Learn how to lose.

Did you take it?

Yes. I’ve learned winning is fun but not the most important thing about training and competing. My main focus is on learning good form and technique first before winning. Learning how to lose is just as important as winning.

What characteristics do you strive for (on and off the platform)?

I always try to do my best and focus on my form and technique.

When you have random free time, how do you spend it?

Most of my time is spent at school, training at Garage Strength, or playing baseball or wrestling. My free time is spent catching up on homework and playing Minecraft.

If you could master anything (besides weightlifting), what would it be?

To be a great baseball player.

What have you learned from weightlifting that helps you in other parts of your life?

Weightlifting helps me become a better athlete and to do better in other sports. My strength training has help me with wrestling.

What are you most grateful for?

My family for supporting me with weightlifting and taking me to my meets.

Where does your strength come from?

From the awesome programming of my coach Dane Miller and not my Dad 😊

The Gift of Coaching: An Interview with Dennis Espinosa

Coach Dennis Espinosa, of Salina, Kansas is a well-known name in U.S. weightlifting.  Espinosa has been a weightlifting coach for over 20 years, is an International Weightlifting Federation Category I Referee and has coached numerous athletes to the national and international levels.  In this interview, Espinosa talks about the benefits of youth weightlifting, the challenges of coaching and the transformation of the sport over the past 20 years.

Q: When did you first become involved in weightlifting?

A: My mother was a fan of weightlifting in the Olympic Games.  I remember watching the 1976 Games with her on TV and sharing her excitement for the sport.  There were no Olympic weightlifting opportunities available to me at the time, but I was very interested in the sport.  In my late teens, I got involved in powerlifting and bodybuilding.  I continued these sports when I opened my own gym in 1988.  In 1997, I turned my attention to Olympic weightlifting and became a sanctioned club with USA weightlifting.

Q: Tell me about your weightlifting program.

A: I currently coach 16 youth athletes in two separate programs.  My competitive program is called Reps and Sets Team Salina.  Right now, I train eight competitive weightlifters in this program.  I also run a strength and conditioning program through the Parks & Rec department.  The athletes in this program receive general strength training.  I use the strength and conditioning program as a feeder program for my competitive team.  It helps me identify athletes with the interest and talent to succeed in competitive weightlifting.  Also, involvement with the Parks and Rec department gives me a free place to train my competitive team!

Q: What does your typical training session look like?

A: I begin with Coaching Corner, where I gather all of my athletes together and give them an overview of what we will be doing that day.  Then, we perform a General Warm Up and a Specific Warm Up, which includes core and stability exercises as well as skill transfer drills. Finally, we proceed into the Olympic lifts.

Q: What benefits does weightlifting offer to youth?

A: Weightlifting requires a tremendous amount of discipline.  Kids who stick with the sport learn to organize themselves, become self-reliant, and control their minds and bodies.

Q: Why do you like working with youth athletes?

A: Training a new weightlifter is like unwrapping a gift.  You don’t know what talent a child holds until you begin working with him.  I enjoy training all types of weightlifters—high energy ones, quiet ones—it is always an adventure figuring out how to motivate and get the best out of each lifter.

Q: What is the hardest thing about being a coach?

A: When lifters leave.  A good coach invests himself in each of his athletes.  He learns their personalities, what motivates them, and how to develop them into the best versions of themselves.  When athletes leave—for whatever reason—it is heartbreaking.

Q: You’ve spent 20 years coaching Olympic weightlifting.  In this time, the sport has completely transformed.  To what do you attribute this?

A: Olympians always increase awareness and interest for a sport.  So, having weightlifters from the U.S. in the Olympic Games has brought more attention to the sport.  CrossFit has also had a huge influence by introducing athletes to the Olympic lifts.  In fact, CrossFit is probably the best thing that has happened to the sport of weightlifting!

Q: What is different about the sport of weightlifting now than when you started?

A: Young coaches are able to develop their athletes much more successfully now than when I started.  This has put the sport in a better position.  There are now more talented youth weightlifters than ever before in the U.S.

 

Q: Why is this?

A: USA Weightlifting’s coaching curriculum is better developed in recent days.  Coaches better understand how to motivate athletes, program, and deal with the mental aspects of coaching.  Also, information on weightlifting is more readily available and shared.

 

Q: What advice would you give to new weightlifting coaches?

A: Become a referee.  As a coach, it is absolutely essential to know the rules of the sport.  The information you gain in the referee courses will benefit your athletes and give you a better understanding of the sport.  Soon after becoming a weightlifting coach, I became a referee.  The information I gained in the referee courses has made me a better coach.

Also, compliment your lifters regularly.  Don’t tear them down; always build them up.

In the Shoes of an Olympian

Youth Weightlifting Abby Flickner Interview

Abby Flickner, of Shawnee Kansas is your typical 13-year old girl. She loves to read, play the trumpet, and train in weightlifting shoes given to her by Olympian Morghan King. Ok, Abby is not so typical. She has been weightlifting since she was six-years old, has her own athletic clothing line, and holds three Youth American Records. Here is a glimpse into her life . . .

Q: How did you get started in weightlifting?

A: My older brother had been weightlifting for a while, and I thought it would help me get stronger for gymnastics. Eventually, I gave up my other sports—gymnastics, softball, and volleyball to focus exclusively on weightlifting.

Q: What do you enjoy most about weightlifting?

A: Weightlifting offers some good life lessons. If you don’t focus on your lift, it won’t be very good. Similarly, if you don’t focus on homework, you won’t get a good grade. And if you don’t focus on the task at hand, you won’t succeed.

Q: What does your training schedule look like?

A: I train two hours per day, six days a week with my coach, Boris Urman, at Bootcamp Fitness.

Q: What one or two things do you do in training that are particularly impactful?

A: Squats and lower back training! It’s easy to get a heavy barbell off the floor, but you have to have strong legs and a strong core to stand up with it.

Q: What do you carry around in your gym bag that has nothing to do with weightlifting?

A: Candy

Q: What is your diet like?

A: I try to eat as much as I can to move up a weight class. I eat lots of protein, fruit and veggies. I usually eat two suppers, one before gym and one after. I also like to eat candy!

Q: Who do you look up to in the sport?

A: Morghan King. She accomplished a lot in a very short amount of time, and she has been supportive of my lifting. She gave me the shoes I wear in training!

Q: What qualities does a great coach possess?

A: A great coach isn’t afraid to tell you what you’ve done wrong. Weight-lifting can be a dangerous sport if you don’t do it correctly.

Q: What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

A: Don’t worry about what weight is on the bar . . . just lift it.

Q: Did you take this advice?

A: I try, but it’s hard not to think about the weight.

Q: When you are not weightlifting, how do you spend your free time?

A: I like to read, ride my bike and play the trumpet. I would also like to learn how to cook.

Q: When was the last time you were knocked down and how did you get back up?

A: Youth Nationals in 2016. It was the first time I had been beaten in three years. I’m still in the process of recovering, but I’ve made progress.

Q: What have you learned from weightlifting that helps you in other parts of your life?

A: Anything you want to achieve requires hard work and a good mindset.

Q: Where does your strength come from?

A: Some of it comes naturally, but mostly it comes from training hard.